northern spotted owl conservation strategy
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northern spotted owl conservation strategy implications for Pacific northwest forest invertebrates and associated ecosystem processes by David Magnus Olson

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Published by Xerces Society in Portland, Or .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Invertebrates -- Northwest, Pacific.,
  • Forest animals -- Northwest, Pacific.,
  • Forest conservation -- Northwest, Pacific.,
  • Wildlife conservation -- Northwest, Pacific.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementprimary author and technical contact, David M. Olson .
ContributionsXerces Society., United States. Forest Service. Northern Spotted Owl EIS Team.
The Physical Object
Pagination51 p. :
Number of Pages51
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL15404973M

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A Conservation Strategy for the Northern Spotted Owl [Thomas, John Ward, et. Al.] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. A Conservation Strategy for the Northern Spotted OwlAuthor: et. Al. Thomas, John Ward. texts All Books All Texts latest This Just In Smithsonian Libraries FEDLINK A conservation strategy for the northern spotted owl Item Preview remove-circle Northern spotted owl conservation plan: state of California ; Northern spotted owl conservation plan: state of Oregon ; Northern spotted owl conservation plan: state of Washington. A conservation strategy for the northern spotted owl / - Biodiversity Heritage Library The Biodiversity Heritage Library works collaboratively to make biodiversity literature openly available to the world as part of a global biodiversity community. BHL works best with JavaScript enabledCited by: Northern Spotted Owls have large home range requirements. They are adversely affected by reductions in late-successional forest. Habitat loss due to uncharacteristically severe fire is of particular concern in the Klamath Mountains ecoregion.

DNR’s Trust Lands Habitat Conservation Plan (HCP) covers state forestlands managed by DNR within the range of the northern spotted owl (Strix occidentalis caurina). This includes million acres of state trust lands west of the Cascade Mountains and on the eastern slopes of the Cascades. RECOVERY STRATEGY FOR THE NORTHERN SPOTTED OWL. (Strix occidentalis caurina) IN BRITISH COLUMBIA. Under the Accord for the Protection of Species at Risk (), the federal, provincial, and territorial governments agreed to work together on legislation, programs, and policies to protect wildlife species at risk throughout Size: KB. Spotted Owl. Strix occidentalis. Because it requires old-growth forest, this owl has been at the center of fierce controversy between conservationists and the logging industry in the Pacific Northwest. The owl itself seems anything but fierce: it has a gentle look, and it . Title. A conservation strategy for the northern spotted owl / Title Variants: Alternative: A conservation strategy for the northern spotted owl: report of the Interagency Scientific Committee to address the conservation of the northern spotted owl Alternative: Report of the Interagency Scientific Committee to address the conservation of the northern spotted owl.

inadequate as a conservation strategy. The primary reason the Final Plan fails as a sufficient conservation strategy for the northern spotted owl is that it represents a reduction in the total area of federal lands dedicate to the species recovery. As best we can determine, the amount of habitat within designated reserves. How are the Northern Spotted Owls Protected? Federal Forestland Preserved from Management. There are more than million acres of federal forests in Washington. Almost half of the federal land, million acres, is preserved from management in national parks, monuments, and wilderness areas. Land within the Northwest Forest Plan Boundary which has a plan to complement the federal conservation strategy. Management plans for the Northern Spotted Owl. Washington State’s contribution to owl recovery on non-federal lands was developed through a collaborative stakeholder process, and adopted into law in Northern spotted owls are one of three subspecies of spotted owls. The other two are the Mexican spotted owl and the California spotted owl. Each of these owls is brown with white spots, but the northern spotted owl is the darkest brown with the smallest spots and has darker facial disks (the feathers surrounding the eyes).